The first question should be: "why are we doing this?"

This is a concept and methodology borrowed from Category theory. Once an end goal has been defined, it's helpful to determine how to get there from where we currently are. Are the resources we have (time, people, materials, etc.) sufficient to achieve the goal? If not, what will it cost to acquire the needed resources? How many different ways can resources be combined to achieve the end goal? Which path should be chosen?

It's a fun exploration, and in my opinion, should be done very early in the process of designing a solution. The magic of this approach is that it works for any medium, no matter what the end output may be. And for natural scatterbrains like myself, it is an invaluable process that helps to actually get things done, and done properly.

A chart showing the decision making process from category theory

The first question should be: "why are we doing this?"

This is a concept and methodology borrowed from Category theory. Once an end goal has been defined, it's helpful to determine how to get there from where we currently are. Are the resources we have (time, people, materials, etc.) sufficient to achieve the goal? If not, what will it cost to acquire the needed resources? How many different ways can resources be combined to achieve the end goal? Which path should be chosen?

It's a fun exploration, and in my opinion, should be done very early in the process of designing a solution. The magic of this approach is that it works for any medium, no matter what the end output may be. And for natural scatterbrains like myself, it is an invaluable process that helps to actually get things done, and done properly.

A chart showing the decision making process from category theory

Stay low-fi as long as possible.

There's something magical about pen and paper, or a huge whiteboard. Spending time working through flows, or sketching out thumbnails can often look messy but clarity and strategy eventually emerge. It also ensures I don't get bogged down in pixel-perfection too early in the process.

Discover, define, design, deliver and do over, as needed

I like to start with lots of questions, explore possible answers, find the viable pathways, and simplify continuously. Using this approach at the micro and macro level makes for a better end product.

Chart describing UX and Engineering collaboration